Excelsior Brigade (70th, 71st, 72nd, and 74th New York Regiments)

Posted to the Project on 19 Sep 07

Excelsior Brigade MonumentThe Excelsior Brigade (70th, 71st, 72nd, 73rd, and 74th New York Regiments) is honored by a monument and four position stones at Gettysburg (denoting the location of the 70th, 71st, 72nd, and 74th Regiments).

About the Main Monument

When was it dedicated? Cornerstone laid July 2, 1888; Dedicated July 2, 1893.

What is it made out of? Canopy and base: Concord granite; Columns: Keesville New York Hypersthene granite; Plaques: bronze.

What size is it? Overall: approx. 21 ft. 7 in. x 4 ft. 6 in. x 4 ft. 6 in.; Eagle: approx. H. 2 ft. 9 in.; Base: approx. 9 in. x 6 ft. 2 in. x 6 ft. 2 in.

Who made it? Bauer, Theo, sculptor. Power, Maurice J., 1838-1902, sculptor. New England Monument Company, fabricator. Railway Granite and Marble Works, fabricator.

What does it depict? Granite structure with five-sided base and five polished green granite columns which support a circular canopy that is topped with a bronze eagle. The five sides of the base represent the five New York regiments, and each side features a bronze plaque with an inscription detailing the battles of each of the regiments. The monument cost $7,500. Each side is 6.2 foot and capped with a granite dome with bronze eagle. Bronze tablets are located on each side of the base and are located on the frieze. Overall height is 21.7 foot. The cornerstone of the monument was laid on the twenty-fifth anniversary of the battle, July 2, 1888. The monument’s interior was supposed to feature a bust of General Dan Sickles. However, Sickles embezzled $28,000.00 from the New York Civil War monument fund and as such the bust was never erected and the spot for the bust still sits empty.

What does it honor? The five regiments raised, the 70th, 71st, 72nd, 73rd, and 74th New York Infantries, fought as reinforcements along the Union lines on the Emittsburg Road. The monument to the five regiments is located on the site representing a central position.

How is it inscribed? SICKLES’ EXCELSIOR BRIGADE E PLURIBUS UNUM / 2ND BRIGADE/2ND DIV 3RD CORP/COL. W. R. BREWSTER, COMMANDING POSITION JULY 2, 1863 2-6 PM/JULY 3 SUPPORTED LEFT CENTRE

When was this photograph taken? February 6, 2009.

Where is it located? Located Gettysburg National Military Park, Sickles Avenue at Excelsior Field, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania 17325. Located on the west side of Sickles Avenue between Wheatfield Road and United States Avenue.

Is this monument located along the NPS Auto Tour route? Yes.

Has this monument been moved or changed? This monument has not been moved or materially altered.

Monument Details, Alternative Views, and Contextual Views

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Secondary Monuments and Markers

70th New York StoneMonument Title: 70th New York Infantry

Photographed: May 1, 2010.

Location: Excelsior Field. West of Sickles Avenue between Wheatfield Road and United States Avenue.

Description: Stone Marker denotes the location of the 70th New York Infantry. Position markers are 2.6×1.8 foot.

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71st New York StoneMonument Title: 71st New York Infantry

Photographed: May 1, 2010.

Location: Excelsior Field. West of Sickles Avenue between Wheatfield Road and United States Avenue.

Description: Stone Marker denotes the location of the 71st New York Infantry. Position markers are 2.6×1.8 foot.

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72nd New York StoneMonument Title: 72nd New York Infantry

Photographed: May 1, 2010.

Location: Excelsior Field. West of Sickles Avenue between Wheatfield Road and United States Avenue.

Description: Stone Marker denotes the location of the 72nd New York Infantry. Position markers are 2.6×1.8 foot.

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74th New York StoneMonument Title: 74th New York Infantry

Photographed: May 1, 2010.

Location: Excelsior Field. West of Sickles Avenue between Wheatfield Road and United States Avenue.

Description: Stone Marker denotes the location of the 74th New York Infantry. Position markers are 2.6×1.8 foot.

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At Gettysburg

The Excelsior Brigade served in Humphreys’ Division of the Third Corps, Army of the Potomac. The 70th, 72nd, and 74th Were Fighting 300 Regiments.

70th Infantry ~ Soldiers Buried in the New York Plot of the Gettysburg National Cemetery:

  • Pvt. William H. Ackerman, Company I, G-22
  • Pvt. George Buggins, Company I, G-44
  • Pvt. James Clegg, Company I, E-61
  • Sgt. Isaac L. Decker, Company F, A-93
  • Pvt. William H. Diper, Company H, G-40
  • Pvt. George W. Douglass, Company I, F-71
  • Pvt. Henry C. Dunnell, Company D, D-23
  • Pvt. John Higgins, Company G, C-59
  • Pvt. John Jolliff, Company F, E-42
  • Pvt. John W. Kessler, Company D, D-42
  • Cpl. Samuel Lambert, Company F, D-49
  • Pvt. John McKenna, Company C, F-54
  • Pvt. James Montgomery, Company E, B-128
  • Pvt. John Nolan, Company K, G-66
  • Pvt. John E. Rickley, Company D, E-111
  • Pvt. John Robb, Company K, F-50
  • Pvt. Michael L. Ryan, Company C, F-51
  • Pvt. Thomas Smith, Company K, E-65
  • Cpl. Louis Solomon, Company B, G-32
  • Sgt. Francis M. Stowell, Company D, D-125

71st Infantry ~ Officers Killed at Gettysburg:

  • 2nd Lieutenant Andrew W. Estes, Company H, 26, of Staten Island, F-39

Soldiers Buried in the New York Plot of the Gettysburg National Cemetery:

  • Pvt. Alfred G. Arms, Company H, C-55
  • Cpl. Joseph Battelle, Company A, D-51
  • Pvt. James Brady, Company A, F-60
  • Pvt. Daniel Canty, Company C, C-57
  • Pvt. Charles Gorman, Company E, F-66
  • Pvt. David Holland, Company F, F-25
  • Pvt. Timothy Kearns, Company A, E-84
  • Sgt. Thomas King, Company E, B-66
  • Pvt. Patrick Olvany, Company A, F-68
  • Cpl. Conrad Schuler, Company D, A-82

72nd Infantry ~ Officers Killed at Gettysburg:

  • 2nd Lieutenant Charles A. Foss, Company C, mortally wounded on July 2, 22, of Dunkirk, buried in National Cemetery at A-84

Soldiers Buried in the New York Plot of the Gettysburg National Cemetery:

  • Pvt. Gottlob Hirsche, Company A, C-51
  • Pvt. Frederick Platte, Company E, D-45

74th Infantry ~ Soldiers Buried in the New York Plot of the Gettysburg National Cemetery:

  • Cpl. Henry Burk, Company B, A-87
  • Pvt. John Casey, Company H, G-47
  • Sgt. Alexandre Gacon, Company B, G-39
  • Pvt. Seth Harpwell, Company C, G-37
  • Pvt. Edwin A. Hess, Company F, A-86
  • Sgt. Washington Knight, Company C, G-43
  • Sgt. John Knox, Company K, G-65
  • Pvt. David Maywood, Company E, B-65

Commander: 70th New York commanded by Col. John E. Farnum (1824-1870); engaged 371; 20 killed, 93 wounded, 4 missing. 71st New York commanded by Col. Henry L. Potter (1828-1907); engaged 243; 10 killed, 68 wounded, 13 missing. 72nd New York commanded by Col. John S. Austin (1817-1865); engaged 366; 7 killed, 79 wounded, 28 missing. 74th New York commanded by Lt. Col. Thomas Holt (1831-1897); engaged 275; 12 killed, 74 wounded, 3 missing.

After Action Report: After Action Reports of the 70th, 71st, and 72nd New York Infantry Regiments (will open a pop up window).

Medal of Honor Winners: HORAN, THOMAS. Rank and organization. Sergeant, Company E, 72d New York Infantry. Place and date: At Gettysburg, Pa., 2 July 1863. Entered service at: Dunkirk, N.Y. Birth:——. Date of issue: 5 April 1898. Citation: In a charge of his regiment this soldier captured the regimental flag of the 8th Florlda Infantry (C.S.A.).

General Information

Raised: At large.

Regimental History ~ Dyer’s Compendium of the War of the Rebellion:

70th New York

Organized under authority of the War Department as 1st Regiment, Sickles’ Brigade, at Camp Scott, Staten Island, N.Y., and mustered in June 20, 1861. Left State for Washington, D.C., July 23, 1861. Attached to Sickles’ Brigade, Division of the Potomac, to October, 1861. Sickles’ Brigade, Hooker’s Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. (Designated 70th Regiment New York Infantry December 11, 1861.) 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 3rd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 2nd Army Corps, to May, 1864. 4th Brigade, 3rd Division, 2nd Army Corps, to July, 1864.

SERVICE.–Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D. C., until March, 1862. Expedition to Lower Maryland September 15-October 2, 1861. Advance on Manassas, Va., March 10, 1862. Expedition from Dumfries to Fredericksburg and capture of stores March 18. Reconnaissance from Liverpool Point to Stafford Court House, Va., and action at Stafford Court House April 4. Ordered to the Peninsula, Va. Siege of Yorktown April 10-May 4. Battle of Williamsburg May 5. Battle of Seven Pines or Fair Oaks May 31-June 1. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Battles of Oak Grove June 25; Peach Orchard and Savage Station, White Oak Swamp and Glendale June 30; Malvern Hill July 1 and August 5. At Harrison’s Landing until August 16. Movement to Fortress Monroe, thence to Centreville August 16-28. Pope’s Campaign in Northern Virginia August 26-September 2. Action at Bristoe Station or Kettle Run August 27. Battles of Groveton August 29; Bull Run August 30; Chantilly September 1. Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D.C., until November. At Fairfax Station, Va., until November 25. Operations on the Orange & Alexandria Railroad November 10-12. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. Duty at Falmouth until April 27, 1863. “Mud March” January 20-24. Operations about Rappahannock Bridge and Grove Church February 5-7. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Battle of Chancellorsville May 1-5. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June 11-July 24. Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-3. Pursuit of Lee July 5-24. Wapping Heights, Va., July 23. Duty on line of the Rappahannock until October. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Kelly’s Ford November 7. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Payne’s Farm November 27. Duty near Brandy Station until May, 1864. Demonstration on the Rapidan February 6-7. Campaign from the Rapidan to the James River May 3-June 15. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7; Spottsylvania May 8-12; Po River May 10; Spottsylvania Court House May 12-21. Assault on the Salient or “Bloody Angle” May 12. Harris Farm or Fredericksburg Road May 19. North Anna River May 23-26. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Before Petersburg June 16-18. Ordered to New York for muster out June 22. Veterans and Recruits transferred to 86th Regiment New York Infantry. Mustered out July 7, 1864, to date from July 1, 1864, expiration of term. Regiment lost during service 9 Officers and 181 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 62 Enlisted men by disease. Total 254.

71st New York

Organized under authority of the War Department at Camp Scott, Staten Island, N.Y., as 2nd Regiment, Sickles’ Brigade, June, 1861. Left State for Washington, D.C., July 23, 1861. Attached to Sickles’ Brigade, Division of the Potomac, to October, 1861. Sickles’ Brigade, Hooker’s Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 3rd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 2nd Army Corps, to May, 1864. 4th Brigade, 3rd Division, 2nd Army Corps, to July, 1864.

SERVICE.–Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D. C., until March, 1862. Expedition to Lower Maryland September 15-October 2, 1861. Expedition to Matthias Point November 9. Advance on Manassas, Va., March 10, 1862. Expedition from Dumfries to Fredericksburg, Va., and capture of stores March 18. Reconnaissance from Liverpool Point to Stafford Court House and action at Stafford Court House April 4. Ordered to the Peninsula, Va., April. Siege of Yorktown April 10-May 4. Battle of Williamsburg May 5. Battle of Seven Pines or Fair Oaks May 31-June 1. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Battles of Oak Grove June 25; Peach Orchard and Savage Station June 29; White Oak Swamp and Glendale June 30; Malvern Hill July 1 and August 5. At Harrison’s Landing until August 16. Movement to Fortress Monroe, thence to Centreville August 16-26. Pope’s Campaign in Northern Virginia August 26-September 2. Action at Bristoe Station or Kettle Run August 27. Battles of Groveton August 29; Bull Run August 30. Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D.C., until November. At Fairfax Station to November 25. Operations on the Orange & Alexandria Railroad November 10-12. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. At Falmouth until April 27, 1863. “Mud March” January 20-24. Operations at Rappahannock Bridge and Grove Church February 5-7. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Battle of Chancellorsville May 1-5. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June 11-July 24. Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-3. Pursuit of Lee to Manassas Gap, Va., July 5-24. Wapping Heights July 23. Duty on line of the Rappahannock until October. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Kelly’s Ford November 7. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Payne’s Farm November 27. Duty near Brandy Station, Va., until May, 1864. Demonstration on the Rapidan February 6-7. Campaign from the Rapidan to the James River May 3-June 15. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7; Spottsylvania May 8-12; Po River May 10; Spottsylvania Court House May 12-21. Assault on the Salient or “Bloody Angle” May 12. Harris Farm or Fredericksburg Road May 19. North Anna River May 23-26. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Before Petersburg June 16-18. Siege of Petersburg June 16-July 7. Jerusalem Plank Road, Weldon Railroad, June 22-23. Veterans and Recruits transferred to 120th Regiment, New York Infantry, July 7. Regiment mustered out at New York City July 30, 1864, expiration of term. Regiment lost during service 5 Officers and 83 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 73 Enlisted men by disease. Total 163.

72nd New York

Organized under authority of the War Department at Camp Scott, Staten Island, N Y., as 3rd Regiment, Sickles’ Brigade. Left State for Washington, D. C., July 24, 1861. Attached to Sickles’ Brigade, Division of the Potomac, to October, 1861. Sickles’ Brigade, Hooker’s Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 3rd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 2nd Army Corps, to May, 1864. 4th Brigade, 3rd Division, 2nd Army Corps, to July, 1864.

SERVICE.–Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D.C., until March, 1862. Expedition to Lower Maryland September 15-October 2, 1861. Advance on Manassas, Va., March 10, 1862. Expedition from Dumfries to Fredericksburg, Va., and capture of stores March 18. Reconnaissance from Liverpool Point to Stafford Court House and action at Stafford Court House April 4. Ordered to the Peninsula April. Siege of Yorktown April 10-May 4. Battle of Williamsburg May 5. Battle of Seven Pines or Fair Oaks May 31-June 1. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Battles of Oak Grove June 25. Peach Orchard and Savage Station June 29. White Oak Swamp and Glendale June 30. Malvern Hill July 1 and August 5. At Harrison’s Landing until August 16. Movement to Fortress Monroe, thence to Centreville, August 16-26. Pope’s Campaign in Northern Virginia August 26-September 2. Action at Bristoe Station or Kettle Run August 27. Battles of Groveton August 29. Bull Run August 30. Duty in the Defenses of Washington until November. At Fairfax Station until November 25. Operations on the Orange & Alexandria Railroad November 10-12. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. At Falmouth until April 27. “Mud March” January 20-24. Operations at Rappahannock Bridge and Grove Church February 5-7. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Battle of Chancellorsville May 1-5. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign Jun 11-July 24. Battle of Gettysburg July 1-3. Pursuit of Lee to Manassas Gap July 5-24. Wapping Heights, Va., July 23. Duty on line of the Rappahannock until October. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Kelly’s Ford November 7. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Payne’s Farm November 27. Duty near Brandy Station until May, 1864. Demonstration on the Rapidan February 6-7. Campaign from the Rapidan to the James River May 3-June 15. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7. Spottsylvania May 8-12. Po River May 10. Spottsylvania Court House May 12-21. Assault on the Salient or “Bloody Angle” May 12. Harris Farm, or Fredericksburg Road, May 19. North Anna River May 23-26. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Before Petersburg June 16-18. Eight Companies mustered out June 20, 1864 (Cos. “A,” “B,” “D,” “E,” “F,” “I” and “K”). Companies “C,” “G” and “H” attached to 120th Regiment, New York Infantry. Company “C” mustered out July 20. Company “G” July 2 and Company “H” October 31, 1864. Veterans and Recruits transferred to 120th Regiment New York Infantry. Regiment lost during service 11 Officers and 150 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 88 Enlisted men by disease. Total 250.

73rd New York

See separate entry for the 73rd New York.

74th New York

Organized under authority of the War Department at Camp Scott, Staten Island, N.Y., as 5th Regiment, Sickles’ Brigade. Left State for Washington, D.C., August 20, 1861. Attached to Sickles’ Brigade, Division of the Potomac, to October, 1861. Sickles’ Brigade, Hooker’s Division. Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. Designated 74th New York Infantry December 11, 1861. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 3rd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 2nd Army Corps. to May, 1864. 4th Brigade, 3rd Division, 2nd Army Corps, to July, 1864. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 2nd Army Corps, to August, 1864.

SERVICE.–Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D. C, until March, 1862. Expedition to Lower Maryland September 15-October 2, 1861. Expedition to Matthias Point November 9. Advance on Manassas, Va., March 10, 1862. Expedition from Dumfries to Fredericksburg, Va., and capture of stores March 18. Reconnaissance from Liverpool Point to Stafford Court House and action at Stafford Court House April 4. Ordered to the Virginia Peninsula April. Siege of Yorktown April 10-May 4. Battle of Williamsburg May 5. Battle of Seven Pines or Fair Oaks May 31-June 1. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Battles of Oak Grove June 25; Peach Orchard and Savage Station June 29; White Oak Swamp and Glendale June 30; Malvern Hill July 1 and August 5. At Harrison’s Landing until August 16. Movement to Fortress Monroe, thence to Centreville August 16-26. Pope’s Campaign in Northern Virginia August 26-September 2. Action at Bristoe Station or Kettle Run August 27. Battles of Groveton August 29; Bull Run August 30. Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D.C., until November. At Fairfax Station until November 25. Operations on Orange & Alexandria Railroad November 10-12. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. At Falmouth until April 27, 1863. “Mud March” January 20-24. Operations at Rappahannock Bridge and Grove Church February 5-7. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Battle of Chancellorsville May 1-5. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June 11-July 24. Battle of Gettysburg July 1-3. Pursuit of Lee to Manassas Gap, Va., July 5-24. Wapping Heights July 23. Duty on the Rappahannock until October. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Kelly’s Ford November 7. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Payne’s Farm November 27. Duty near Brandy Station until May, 1864. Demonstration on the Rapidan February 6-7. Campaign from the Rapidan to the James River May 3-June 15. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7; Spottsylvania May 8-12; Po River May 10; Spottsylvania Court House May 12-21. Assault on the Salient or “Bloody Angle” May 12. Harris Farm or Fredericksburg Road May 19. North Anna River May 23-26. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Before Petersburg June 16-19. Siege of Petersburg June 16 to August 3. Jerusalem Plank Road, Weldon Railroad, June 22-23. Demonstration north of the James July 27-29. Deep Bottom July 27-28. Regiment mustered out before Petersburg, Va., by Companies as follows: Company “D” June 19, Company “A” June 21, Company “B” June 26, Company “G” June 28, Company “C” July 6, Companies “E,” “F,” “H,” “I” and “K” August 3, 1864. Veterans and Recruits transferred to 40th Regiment New York Infantry August 3 as Companies “G” and “H.” Regiment lost during service 8 Officers and 122 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 67 Enlisted men by disease. Total 199.

[Pennsylvania]

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